DSP Bighorn SHL SHR Adjustable Seat Post


Adjustable seatposts have gained quite a bit of popularity and many manufacturers are building their bikes to work with a wide variety of dropper posts to help their customers get the most out of their biking experience. Inside we take a look at DSP’s Bighorn offering to meet the needs of riders seeking a dropper seatpost.

DSP Bighorn

What a dropper post like this does is allow you to quickly adjust the height of the seatpost with the press of a lever. No more having to pull over to drop your post for a descent or raise it for a climb. It can all be done while riding with the remote lever.

The Bighorn comes in a nicely packed box

There are a lot of players in the market of dropper posts but the biggest contenders would be RockShox’s Reverb, Kind Shock (KS), Specialized Command Post Blacklite, and many more out there.

The DSP Bighorn on the Yeti SB66

DSP has an offering called the Bighorn that we’ve been riding for quite some time now and we thought it would be great to tell you more about it and our experiences on-board this new contender. It comes in at a very competitive price compared to the competition at $265 considering all of the benefits. Curious where the name Bighorn came from? Look no further than the seat clamps for the answer.

The DSP Bighorn is available in two models, SHL and SHR. The SHL model utilizes a lever underneath the seatpost and the SHR shown here is a remote lever that is mounted on the bar to aid in adjusting the seat height on the fly.

How to use the DSP Bighorn SHR:

  • To lower the seat, press the lever on the handlebar and push weight down on the saddle.
  • To raise the seat, press the lever on the saddle to return it to full height. If you desire to stop it midway, you can stop it with your butt to the desired position.

Bighorn SHR Specifications

  • Option: Remote
  • Material: Aluminum
  • Post length: 447mm
  • Cable: Type standard shift cable
  • Travel: 4.5″ (for 30.9mm OD & 31.6mm OD)
  • OD: 30.9mm / 31.6mm
  • 631.6g with cable

The DSP Bighorn is a quality seat post that has lasted the test of time for us so far. No maintenance, bleeding, or anything needed to keep this reliable post ticking for almost all of this year on a variety of bikes and conditions. Some of the common ailments with other dropper posts we’ve experienced include having to re-bleed them, faulty seat post heads that struggle to resist moving even when properly torqued, ball-breaking fast return speeds, looseness that develops side to side play in the seat post shaft, stickyness in actuation, and a variety of other issues.

height marks along the side of the post

Out of the box the DSP Bighorn is a tidy seat post that we have been quite pleased with. The fit and finish is great and we had no major quarrels with the post. The height numbers on the seatpost we felt would’ve been better served to be facing the back or 90º to the side but ours was staggered a little bit. The first time the seatpost needed to be actuated it required a firm plop on the saddle to activate it.

DSP is investigating various colors

The DSP Bighorn has a clean look to it and we’ve seen on DSP’s Facebook page that they were also experimenting with a variety of colored heads that looked quite good as well. Perhaps we’ll see other color options for users in the aftermarket? Let DSP know if you’re interested in alternative colors.

As time went on the seat post seals did break in a bit more but from time to time if the bike was left for a long time unmoved it sometimes took some mild coaxing to freely move. The DSP Bighorn adjustable seatpost allows you to stop the saddle at any position in the 4.5″ range so there is no predetermined position it must be at which is great. Even carrying the bike from the seat with the post dropped wasn’t a problem for us.

Bighorn seat tube clamp

The DSP Bighorn has never developed any slop in any way.The seat is securely clamped by the bighorn clamps and its 5mm allen bolts. Each side uses its own 5mm allen bolt as well so each side clamped the rails securely that made for a slip-free affair. There aren’t any visual marks to help aid you in re-angling the seat like you might see on a Thomson or Reverb.

Top with one side of the seat tube big-horn removed and cable installed

The cable feeds into the top of the head and there is a 3mm adjuster rod that lets you also adjust the lever throw necessary to activate the post.  The seatpost also easily rotates up or down to facilitate access to this area.

Adjustable 3mm allen to tweak the remote lever-throw necessary to activate

There were no squeaking or noises either from this post during our usage with it so far. The return speed is quite acceptable and it can be tuned easily to have a slow or fast return speed by adjusting the PSI in the seatpost located at the bottom.

Adjustable PSI to adjust the return-speed

Video:

Return speed is slow enough at the minimum PSI to not smack you too hard. If you want it faster, it is easy to add more air to the seatpost.

The DSP Bighorn’s cable comes out of the top of the seatpost so there is some cable management to consider when the post is dropped and raised. Some of the most recent dropper posts on the market have tried to solve this issue with varying success but it is important to mention that this one mounts to the top of the head itself.

Lever installed - adjustable tension screw

The lever has a very nice feel to it and works great and if you’ve running a 1x setup (no front derailleur) it mounts into position very well. If you’ve got a bunch of other things on your handlebar it can be a bit trickier to find a spot. No cable noodle is included and we’d recommend you find one from an old V-Brake or bike shop as this helps route the cable in a 90º bend towards the side of the bike when exiting the lever.  This makes it easier to route with the flow of the other cables on the bike.

DSP lever

The nice thing about this hydraulic post that I’ve grown to like is that you don’t have to re-bleed it ever since it uses a cable to actuate, it can use a variety of other competing dropper-post levers, and in the event your cable gets snagged you can easily find a replacement without having to re-bleed it. I had the Bighorn installed on a Specialized Stumpjumper EVO for part of the time and was able to use the Specialized Command Post lever which is integrated into the grip’s lockring.

The DSP Bighorn provides 4.5″ of travel and that’s certainly enough for me but some people could make the argument for more or less. For my height I find that dropping most dropper posts the entire way is not ideal as I can’t pinch the saddle with my thighs as easily as I’d like. I rarely dropped this seat post (or any dropper seat post) too far as my ideal descending saddle height is not too low.

Reason’s like this are why RockShox made their Enduro collar that restricts how low their dropper post goes to avoid this issue as some riders may not need or want to ever drop their seat posts the full amount. The big benefit you get from these posts are confidence in descending without having to compromise your saddle position for the rest of the ride. You can immediately adjust the height of your post to best fit the situation.

Reverb Stealth routing allows you to internally run your dropper post cable

A few manufactures are implementing Reverb Stealth routing on their bikes that allow you to run the cable inside the frame itself and unfortunately with this DSP design you can’t take full advantage of that.

At an MSRP of $265 you are saving quite a bit of money in comparison to most of the competition’s offerings. While this isn’t a cheap seatpost, the benefits a dropper seat post are unmatched for Enduro / All Mountain bikes where you need to raise or lower your saddle during a ride or race. The penalty you pay for this is a little bit of additional weight depending on the seatpost model and cost.

Detailed shot of the top of the DSP Bighorn without cable installed

The DSP Bighorn is a solid post that we’ll be running for sometime given its durability and problem free usage. The cable is easy to replace and the post is a treat to use with a great build quality to it. Overall we’re quite impressed with the DSP Bighorn even though its not perfect as illustrated in the points we’ve made in this review. Functionally its hard to find any major faults with it. We’re excited to see what they come up with next.

Learn more at dspracing.com

Bighorn