Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

Drivetrain

When I was choosing the drivetrain parts for my build I wanted to make sure I kept the bike versatile while realizing how I was going to be using the bike most of the time. I tried to pick parts that will be durable enough for most situations while still trying to keep the weight down. I did not feel that I would be using this bike enough as a trail bike to warrant a front derailleur and dual chainring setup. The frame does have the ability if I want to in the future which is a nice option to have. With respect to gear ratios, I wanted to set up the bike so that it was able to climb when needed but I also didn’t want to pick a ratio that I’d be able to spin out too easily on descents.

Cables – Stock

Why I chose to use stock cables

I chose to run the stock cables because they were already installed with the shifter and made it easier vs using something aftermarket.

Cassette – Shimano Ultegra 6500 12-27t

Why I chose to use a Shimano Ultegra 6500 12-27t cassette

I felt that a 12-27t cassette would be a good set of gears for this build. I felt that by having the lowest gear at 27t and my highest gear at 12t that I’d have enough low and top end for most of my riding situations. I went with a road cassette because they are lighter and the ratios are tighter allowing me to more finely tune the gear I want to be in. I chose to go with the Ultegra level because the weight savings to go up to Dura Ace was not worth the cost for this build.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

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Chain – KMC X9SL

Why I chose to use a KMC X9SL chain

I went with the KMC X9SL chain because of my experience with KMC chains. They have very good strength and durability qualities. The X9SL is a very trick looking chain that is also very light.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

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Chainguide – e.thirteen SRS w/ wide backplate

Why I chose to use a e.thirteen SRS chainguide

I went with e.thirteen because they are highly proven chainguides that I’ve had great experiences with. I did not go with a DRS guide for a dual front chainring setup because I did not see my self using this bike enough for trail riding to warrant the parts. I originally started out with the intention of using e.thirteen’s STS chainguide. However, the STS backplate did not give me enough of an angle to route the chain below the lower link correctly. A quick email to e.thirteen’s support and Jonas was able to diagnose my problem and suggested that I’d be better off by using their SRS wide backplate. This backplate allowed the lower guide to have a bigger angle keeping the chain farther away from the frame.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

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Chainring – e.thirteen 34t guidering

Why I chose to use a e.thirteen 34t guidering

I went with e.thirteen’s 34t guidering because it matched brands with the chainguide, they’re lightweight, and I didn’t get a chainring with my crankset. The 34t chainring allows me to climb well enough for most situations and is a tall enough gear for my top end.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

Crankset – Truvativ Holzfeller OCT crankarms w/ Howitzer Team bottom bracket

Why I chose the Truvativ Holzfeller OCT crankarms with the Howitzer Team bottom bracket

I wanted to use the new Holzfeller OCT’s on this bike because of their strength and lightweight hollow design. SRAM’s published numbers showed that these cranks have very high stiffness and strength numbers vs Shimano’s Saint and RaceFace’s Diabolus cranks. I chose the 170mm version because I felt this length would keep my cranks clear of obstacles without sacrificing too much climbing ability over the 175mm version. I went with Truvativ’s top of the line bottom bracket to mate up with my crank arms to form a nice performing package. The bearings themselves are larger and are protected with 8 seals in order to offer a very durable bottom bracket.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

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*Special thanks needs to be given to Alan at Drop N Zone for working so hard to find these cranks. They were not easy to come by at all and I really appreciate it.

Housing – Nokon

Why I chose Nokon housing

I chose to go with Nokon housing because it’s very slick looking and I wanted to keep my shifting as smooth as possible. Nokon does a good job of keeping dirt and debris from getting to your shift cables as well as helps keep weight down. The Balance is set up to run interrupted housing for the shifter but I was able to fit the Nokon between the routing tabs very nicely and keep a clean look.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

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Pedals – Wellgo MG1

Why I chose Wellgo MG1 pedals

I went with the MG1’s from Wellgo because they are some of the lightest pedals on the market. They aren’t that thin and they don’t really look overly exciting. However, they are durable and have replaceable pins. At this weight and price they are a hard bargain to pass up.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

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Rear Derailleur – Shimano 105

Why I chose a Shimano 105 rear derailleur

I chose to run Shimano’s 105 model because I wanted to run a short cage derailleur that didn’t cost a lot in case I broke it. The 105 tucks up out of the way very nicely and allows me to run a short and tight chain. This model is also one of the only all black derailleurs you can get. This particular one I bought was from 2003 with the original packing grease.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

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Rear Shifter – Shimano M760 XT

Why I chose a Shimano M760 XT shifter

I like the feel of Shimano and the way their shifters work. The M760 offers the ability to have dual release shifting which is nice and it doesn’t cost a lot.

, Proof of Concept: “Do-It-All” Bike

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To see more pictures of the parts check the gallery.

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