Gamut P30 Chainguide

written by J.V. Nixon

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

Introduction:

Gamut USA makes a variety of chainguides that fit a lot of riders’ needs. Gamut has many guides that are lightweight and help to keep you rolling. Gamut saw a need for a 36t specific chainguide and the P30 was born. The P30 fits in between their P20 (32-34t guide) and their P40 (36-40t guide). Gamut currently makes 5 chainguides that are all designed for specific purposes and the P30 is no different.

Who this chainguide is aimed at:

The P30 is aimed at a rider who runs a 36t specific chainguide that wants the security of a chainguide at a low weight. This guide was designed at the request of riders who wanted a higher degree of specificity from their race components. The P30 can be used in a variety of cycling disciplines whether its 4x/dual slalom/slopestyle/freeriding and downhilling. Gamut looked at all the possible ways to trim the P30 and its low weight reflects just that.

The Product:

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

(click to enlarge)

In the box:

  • 36t specific backplate with rollers attached (available in ISCG, ISCG05, and BB mount)
  • Necessary bolts and spacers to mount & space the guide
  • 36t bashring available in white/black/red
  • Instructions
, Gamut P30 Chainguide

what it looks like after a good day of riding (click to enlarge)

Setup:

Setting up the chainguide was quite easy and the instructions were clearly written. Proper setup is key for all chainguides and the Gamut P30 is no different. The guide bolted up easily to the bike and was easy to rotate to the proper position. The backplate was designed to allow it to be oriented in two different ways to fit more bikes. You can move the plastics on the guide from the top to the bottom to give the backplate more adjustability if need be.

The Gamut bashring bolted to our XT crankarm easily but you will have some trouble mounting it to some crankarms like the Middleburn / Race Face / Saints without some modification as the bashguard does not chamfer down to accommodate the need for some arms for increased clearance. Gamut says that you can modify the bashring by removing some material and it will still be covered under warrnaty.

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

(click to enlarge)

After the bashguard and backplate were attached to their respective members it was time for the pieces to come together. Mounting the crankarm and the granny chainring bolts slightly touched the bolts that attached the backplate to the bike. Since the bolts are not countersunk, they stick out a little bit and caused some interference. Removing the washers allowed it to clear just enough to not contact any more. The rationale behind the backplate not having countersunk slots is to enable the plastics to be reversed should you need to angle the guide on some bikes.

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

ISCG tab bolt clearance detail (click to enlarge)

Spacing out the plastics on the backplate was pretty easy. Gamut used a pretty simple system and it worked well. They did however use a variety of bolts, and the lower roller bolt uses a 3/16th bolt. Most bikers won’t have this tool on any common multitool. The lower roller adjusts out by rotating the bolt and locks in place with the nut behind the backplate. It probably is a good idea to locktite the bolt but we had no issues with it coming lose once it was tightened.

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

lower roller detail (click to enlarge)

Once everything was setup, it was ready to roll. Setup was relatively easy and didn’t take long but you might need some additional tools that you might not have. It is imperative that you do make sure whatever chainguide you have is setup correctly or it may not function properly.

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

(click to enlarge)

How well does it work?

The Gamut P30 did its job well and the chain never got thrown. The bashring itself did a decent job at deflecting the blows. The bashring isn’t as solid as some other bashring offerings and shows signs of damage and wear a lot easier should you be bashing the ring into rocks and obstacles. It is important not to over tighten the bashring bolts as well during installation to make sure the bash guard doesn’t crack upon impacts. The lower roller never got hit during use but is exposed somewhat should it get hit.

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

bashring wear detail (click to enlarge)

The way Gamut colors their bashguards is by applying a paint behind the bashguard and since the bashguard is clear it gives the color of the paint. The bashguard paint is applied to the backside and will get worn with use. With some bashing the bashguard started to show some wear but so far has held up well considering what it went through.

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

bashring wear detail (click to enlarge)

The chainguide as a whole was pretty quiet but the lower roller did feel like it had a little more resistance than a toothed-pulley as the chain rolls over the pulley as it sees fit. The lower roller doesn’t quiet the chain like a toothed pulley can and the chain has more freedom to move about. As a whole the chainguide worked well and did its job at keeping the vitals of the drivetrain protected and running smoothly without any major hickups. Additionally since the lower roller does not have any outer guard, mud is free to fall away and not pack up in the lower roller which is a nice feature.

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

(click to enlarge)

Suggested Improvements:

  • A more durable bashguard that is also more compatible with the popular crankarms (Saint / Middleburn / Raceface) without modifications.
  • Colored plastic bashguard instead of using paint.
  • A more protected lower roller by the backplate.
  • A metric bolt for the lower pulley (not an english 3/16 bolt). (Gamut says they use an english/imperial bolt here as it has a higher thread count making it stronger)
  • Recessed backplate slots and some recessed ISCG bolts. (Gamut doesn’t have these as they have setup the backplate to be able to swap the plastic hardware from top to bottom to fit more bikes)

Weight:

Below you’ll see the relevant weights. Depending on your setup, some parts are not needed but this is everything that is in the box.

Including everything but chainring bolts, the P30 ISCG setup we had weighed in at 245g.

Manufacturer Model Year Real(g) Pic.
Gamut P30 36t ISCG backplate
2008
121
, Gamut P30 Chainguide
Gamut P30 (36t bashguard)
2008
110
, Gamut P30 Chainguide
Gamut ISCG bolts w/washers
2008
11
, Gamut P30 Chainguide
Gamut Plastic upper plate spacers
2008
3
, Gamut P30 Chainguide
.      

Price:

$149.99 MSRP

Conclusion:

, Gamut P30 Chainguide

(click to enlarge)

You’ll be hard pressed to find a lighter chainguide system than the Gamut at 245g. The P30 is a 36t specific guide so if you’re interested in running multiple sized chainrings this isn’t the guide for you. Gamut has other guides for that. The P30 design worked well but is a little bit vulnerable if you’re looking for a chaingude that you can bash ruthlessly on rocks and obstacles. For anything but the type of downhilling where you bash your equipment constantly, you’ll be hard pressed to find the limits of this chainguide. For DH use, it will work but isn’t quite as durable at taking a beating like some other offerings available. The P30 chainguide does have some areas where it can improve upon but it worked well as a whole during our testing and never lost a chain. It is one of the lightest guides out there with a full bashguard and it holds up quite well.

You should be able to purchase this, and any other Gamut guide at any good bike shop like RedBarnBicycles as they have distributors all over (BTI). If you’re in Asutraila, XXIV can get you setup.

[Gamut P30 Review Gallery] [Gamut USA Website]