Canfield The One

The Build:

The Frame:

Canfield Brothers doesn’t offer conventional build kits, so we selected parts we felt would fit nicely on The One. The frame can be ordered with a variety of shocks. The One uses a 8.75″ x 2.75″ shock to offer 7″ or 8″ of travel. We used a coil FOX DHX 5 shock on our One but an air shock could be substituted for some weight savings with a little compromise on the suspension.

, Canfield The One

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The medium prototype One frame weighed in at 6.18lbs (2805g) without the shock. With an air shock would weigh ~7lbs, and with the coil DHX shock ~8lbs.

The Fork:

, Canfield The One

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For the fork, we opted to go with a Marzocchi 55 R fork. It comes stock at 140mm travel, but we moved one of the spacers internally to get 160mm as we were told the One worked well with a 160mm shock. The fork is pretty simple and worked well for our build. It didn’t have too many of the bells and whistles found in the higher end Marzocchi models, but it got the job done. The 20mm quick release setup wasn’t the most confidence inspiring in terms of the way it secured the front wheel, but once tightened it didn’t move which was nice.

, Canfield The One

quick release detail (click to enlarge)

The Stem / Bar:

, Canfield The One

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We used the new Race Face 70mm Atlas stem and paired it with a Gravity Light Carbon bar. The setup proved to be quite stiff and has a good feel to it. Carbon bars seem to get better and better each year and the Gravity Light bar is a very nice bar with a nice wide stock length and comfortable rise/sweep. FSA has some nice carbon assembly grease that helps clamp the bars nicely. After the bars were torqued properly, the setup gave no issues so far. The Race Face Atlas stem has some clean styling to it and is pretty light as well. It comes in a variety of lengths and the 70mm 6 degree rise stem we have on there put the bars in a nice position.

, Canfield The One

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The Seat & Seatpost:

, Canfield The One

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The Thomson Elite post is machined beautifully and did its job as expected. The WTB Silverado saddle was quite comfortable for all types of riding this bike went through. The saddle felt a bit longer than other MTB seats but was nice, as it allowed for a variety of setups and proved to be comfortable in all riding environments. The longer nose allowed for a bit more aggressive position during seated climbing and more than enough cushion and grip on the sides for the way down the hill.

The Wheels:

, Canfield The One

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The wheels we used are the new Shimano WH-M776 wheels that are built with a 20mm front and a 135mm rear. The rear uses a quick release and the nice thing about these wheels is that they’re tubeless ready as well. The wheels proved more than capable for the bike and the increased engagement to 36pt over the older XT hubs was nice.

The Tires:

Tires on a bike like this usually have to compromise in some way. Typically you have to either sacrifice on the way up, or on the way down. Schwalbe makes some very nice tires that are very middle of the road that fit nicely for this application but we ended up using a variety of tires on this bike from 2.5″ DHF tires, 2.35″ DHF tires, 2.3″ Tioga Blue Dragon’s, and more.

The Drivetrain:

, Canfield The One

more pictures of the drivetrain can be seen in the gallery (click to enlarge)

For shifting and braking, we opted to use some of the new XT grouppo and it worked quite well. The shifters are crisp and were easy to set up. The brakes are nice and powerful but still allow for a good feel that isn’t too powerful that the brakes lock up instantly. The levers took a little getting used to as the pivot point on the new M775 brake levers are a bit higher than previous Shimano brakes. The lever itself feels pretty good and there are a few tool free adjustments that made set up a bit easier.

, Canfield The One

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The Race Face Atlas AM cranks were nice and shifted pretty effortlessly though the gears. They proved to be more than stiff enough for the bike and weren’t hard to set up. The front derailleur fits a bit tight on the Canfield One but once set up it was issue free.

, Canfield The One

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We had an MRP prototype XCG guide on it as well to provide a little bit of protection since we’re running a three-ring setup. It bolts to the ISCG-old plate on the frame and protected all the rings quite nicely. Often with a trail bike, you’ll have to remove the big ring in exchange for a bash ring but with the XCG guide we didn’t have to loose the 44t ring and it only weighed in at 111g.

, Canfield The One

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